Agriculture-in-Africa

ZERO HUNGER

Hunger is defined as the feeling of discomfort or weakness caused by lack of food, coupled with the desire to eat. Hunger is the leading cause of death in the world, our planet has provided us with tremendous resources but unequal access and inefficient handling leaves millions of people malnourished. About 8.9% of the world lives in hunger an estimated 690 million people, with the highest statistics comes from Lesotho, Afghanistan, Nigeria and Rwanda. With recent studies proving that the world is not on track with conquering world hunger.

The Integrating Capacity and Community Advancement Organization has noted the efforts of world organizations in fighting this epidemic, and has endeavored in ensuring this sustainable development goal is met in Tanzania.

In order to end world hunger milestones to be observed have been put in place, and ICCAO works to meet these target goals.

UNIVERSAL ACCESS TO SAFE AND NUTRITIOUS FOODS

In order to end world hunger, there must be access to nutritious foods particularly to the poor and people in vulnerable situations such as infants and disadvantaged groups.

END ALL FORMS OF MALNUTRITION

It is strategized that by the year 2030, all forms of malnutrition such as stunted growth in children should end, this also includes addressing the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant women and lactating mothers as well as senior citizens.

DOUBLE THE PRODUCTIVITY AND INCOMES OF SMALL SCALE FOOD PRODUCERS

Efforts to improve agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, particularly women, indigenous people, local farmers, pastorals and fishers have been put in place; this includes securing equal access to land and resources such as knowledge financial aid and access to markets.

SUSTAINABLE FOOD PRODUCTION AND RESILIENT AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES

It is targeted that by 2030, the world will be able to have sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, whilst also maintaining the ecosystem, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, floods and other natural disasters while all the while improve land and soil quality.

MAINTAIN THE GENETIC DIVERSITY IN FOOD PRODUCTION

To end world hunger it is necessary to maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants, domesticated animals at the national and regional levels. Countries should also promote access to markets at the international levels while sharing the benefits from the utilization of these genetic resources.

INVEST IN RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE, AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH, TECHNOLOGY AND GENE BANKS

To fight world hunger, there should be an increase in investment through enhanced international cooperation, improved infrastructure in rural areas where agriculture is prominent, technological innovation in plant livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productivity particularly in least developing countries.

PREVENT AGRICULTURAL TRADE RESTRICTIONS, MARKET DISTORTIONS AND EXPORT SUBSIDIES

For food to be universally accessible countries need to correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in agricultural markets, including the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect.

ENSURE STABLE FOOD COMMODITY MARKETS AND TIMELY ACCESS TO INFORMATION

The epidemic that is world hunger can only end when countries adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves in order to help extreme food price volatility.

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